Weaving Olden Patterns

Monday, 26 September 2016

New pattern and two beanies

So, I've finally managed to publish my latest pattern, a nice Tunisian crochet cowl named "Pumpkin Skin". Since it's worked flat then sewn and it uses only one stitch besides the simple stitch it's an ideal project for beginners, for people who've tried TC, found it interesting and would like to try something different but not too hard. I rate it as an easy pattern, from an advanced beginner level on.
You can download a digital copy of it from both my Ravelry and Etsy stores (so far only English is available, Italian version will be there soon!).


Besides working on my own patterns I've also followed others' to make something: I've been asked for a couple of ladies beanies, and though the pattern's title suggests otherwise I've chosen Kim Guzman's "Favorite Beanie for Men". I've never enjoyed making hats and such, I get bored easily and I'm almost never satisfied by how they turn out, but Kim's pattern made me change my mind: these beanies are so much fun to make as they're worked in short rows with a double ended hook, and the stitch creates such a marvelous, soft and elastic fabric - pure delight! I've already made a third in a different colour, and will surely make more. Oh, they're also very quick, takes just a few hours to finish one, so they're a great idea for gifts (especially last-minute ones by crafters who are alway late, lol!). Strongly recommended pattern!


Monday, 12 September 2016

The discovery of "Railway Knitting"

Hi folks! Here's a small adventure that happened to me that I'm gonna tell you about, mainly because it brought me to a really interesting discovery.
Some days ago I received a message on Ravelry from a lady who's made her own Tunisian crochet version of the "Pfeilraupe" scarf. She sent me a picture to show me her work, which was simply stunning: she managed to recreate the exact shape of the knitted one, with marvelous use of short rows, plus in honeycomb stitch, which I love (you can check out her project page here). We exchanged a few messages, and by checking her profile I discovered that I was talking to Dela Wilkins! When the sudden feeling of being a complete idiot for not recognizing her before was gone, I felt (and still feel!) SO privileged: a famous teacher, a published author, took time to write ME about an item we both tried to make in TC.
Wow!!
Well, of course I did some more searching and found that Dela's book on TC, "Railway Knitting Workbook", is available asdigital download on publisher's website and is incredibly cheap! I immediately bought it, read it during the weekend, and let me tell you what I told her: I wish I had found this book when I was learning TC. It's a complete handbook that gives the reader lots of great advice on a technical level, from the ways of making a starting chain on, including tips on shaping, choosing stitches, and such. I found lots of helpful ideas even if I'm not a beginner, so I would really recommend it to anyone interested in TC, but especially if you are an absolute beginner go and buy Dela's book without giving it a second thought. Dela is a teacher, so she knows how to explain things from the start to people who have never hold a hook in their hand before. Also, she's used to having non-native speakers on her train classes, so as she told me she wrote the book in Grade 6 English, very clear and easy to understand even if English is not your main language.

Great, great book that deserves to be known by more and more people!

Oh, and in case you were wondering: "Railway Knitting" is one of the many names used for TC in ancient times, between the 19th and the 20th century, maybe because the look of the Tunisian simple stitch somehow reminds of a railway, maybe because ladies used to work at their items during train trips... nobody knows for certain, as usual when it comes to TC, but it's a fascinating name nonetheless, and since Dela teaches on trains particularly apt for her work.

And since a post without a pic feels somehow incomplete to me, here's a preview of a cowl whose pattern I'm currently writing, named "Pumpkin Skin"...


Monday, 5 September 2016

September: a finished project and a new one

Hello, crafters!
I'm glad to tell you that our "TC Pfeilraupe" has had more than 900 downloads so far - I can't even describe how happy I am about it. Remember to tell me what you think about it, in case you decide to try it yourself: your opinions matter to me!

Since I can't keep my hooks still I've finished another project, this time by an incredibly talented designer you may have heard of, Sheryl Thies. I recently bought both her books about Tunisian crochet ("Get Hooked on Tunisian Crochet" and "Tunisian Crochet Encore") and I must say I absolutely love them. Her way of explaining things is just so good, and her projects are beautiful yet practical items one can actually wear in everyday life. One of these items, from "TC Encore", is the "Ruffled Interlude" scarf, and this one is the project I've just finished. I made it 2 m long and about 2 cm wide, and I used about 200 g of cotton and linen yarn named "Linette" by Miss Tricot Filati with a 10 mm hook. What can I say? This was my first try with TC short rows, and I had so much fun I really want to make another scarf like this - just gotta find someone crochet-worthy, lol!

Talking about new projects, beside some other crocheting going on, yesterday I've opened a FB page dedicated to my crochet ramblings and designs. If you have a FB account and want to take a look around, you're welcome: https://www.facebook.com/OldenPatterns/. The page is new and a bit bare, but I'll hopefully make it grow, so I really hope you'll join me in this new adventure!



Monday, 22 August 2016

It's officially "TC Pfeilraupe"!

Fellow crocheter Brunella Russo-Girard and I are very proud to announce that the Tunisian Crochet versione of the "Pfeilraupe" scarf is finally available!
You can download it for free HERE, both in English and Italian.
As I said in my previous post this is an easy project, suitable for beginners who know the Tunisian simple stitch and a bit about increasing and casting off - yeah, that's all you need to make it. I really hope some of you, my dear readers, will enjoy it!


Monday, 8 August 2016

Is it "Pfeilraupe"??

Why, yes - kinda. Let me tell you a story.

Some weeks ago a wondefully creative lady, Brunella Russo-Girard, shared some pics of her own interpretation of the popular Pfeilraupe scarf, not knitted but made in Tunisian Crochet. Trusting in a talent I myself didn't think I had, she asked me if I would've liked to give it a try, in order to make some design adjustements she tought were needed.
Now, that's some task.
I followed her instructions for the start and the main body, then I had to handle to most difficult part: the holes. As you can see I made 5, not 6, for no particular reason other than that I like uneven numbers better, lol. Apart from this, and from a completely different way of working, the scarf should be quite similar to the original, but worked in the characteristc Tunisian basic stitch.
Both Brunella and I are proud of the result and, with authorization from the author of the original, Alpi Alpenrose, I'm writing the pattern for the TC version of this lovely scarf.
Stay tuned if you're interested, for hopefully the instructions will be available soon! It's an easy and quick project, IMHO ideal for someone who's willing to try something more difficult than a plain rectangular scarf, or for a more expert crocheter who'd like to relax a bit between intricate projects.
In the meantime tell me, what do you think about it?